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Showing posts from October, 2010

An Airline with a sense of humour

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WHAT A PITY KULULA DOESN'T FLY INTERNATIONALLY - WE SHOULD SUPPORT THEM IF ONLY FOR THEIR HUMOUR - SO TYPICALLY SOUTH AFRICAN.
Kulula is an Airline with head office situated in Johannesburg ..
Kulula airline attendants make an effort to make the in-flight "safety
lecture" and announcements a bit more entertaining. Here are some real
examples that have been heard or reported:
On a Kulula flight, (there is no assigned seating, you just sit where
you want) passengers were apparently having a hard time choosing, when a
flight attendant announced, "People, people we're not picking out
furniture here, find a seat and get in it!"


                  ---o0o---

On another flight with a very "senior" flight attendant crew, the pilot
said, "Ladies and gentlemen, we've reached cruising altitude and will be
turning down the cabin lights. This is for your comfort and to enhance
the appearance of your flight attendants."


                  ----o0o---
O…

Airport as a Dispatcher Sees It

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Airport as a Dispatcher Sees It
Russian airport


Daily record of takeoffs and landings at the Domodedovo International Airport is 724.
 Maximum hourly capacity of two runways working simultaneously is 43 aircrafts.
All this air traffic is controlled by dispatchers working day and night at the air traffic control tower.
Profession of air traffic controller is among the most difficult ones speaking of psychological stress.
Let’s spend some time with professionals who control tens thousands of lives.


Domodedovo has two runways and each of them is controlled by the separate dispatcher teams. There is a total of 6 shifts, 10 dispatchers each.










 Probably first what you imagine hearing about an air traffic controller is a typical movie image of a severe man with huge headphones shouting something in a microphone and staring at a round monitor with a green line going round.
 Movies are not always true.
They don’t use headphones, displays are neither round, nor green and not only men can tak…

Flight of the Rays

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"Flight of the Rays"
Photograph by Florian Schulz

Thousands of Munk's devil rays crowd the Sea of Cortez off Mexico's Baja California Sur state in 2009.
German photographer Florian Schulz said the scope of the ray congregations was unknown until he and a pilot happened upon the gathering while searching for migrating whales.
Perhaps just as rare is the composition Schulz captured. "I was able to show how these rays are jumping out of the water," he said, "and at the same time I'm able to show—almost like an underwater photograph—how there're layers and layers and layers of rays."

The International Union for Conservation Union lists Munk's devil rays as near threatened, due in part to their vulnerability to gill nets—hard-to-see "curtains" of netting.
Given ray gatherings like the one pictured, Schulz said, "you could imagine a single net could take thousands and thousands."


Hide and Seek

A gray seal pokes its head t…